Dec. 7, 1941 – Examining the historical link between the past and present Japanese Experience

 

Kristeen Irigoyen- Hernandez aka Lady2Soothe

#PearlHarbor #LetOurVoicesEcho

On December 7, 1941, Japanese planes attacked the United States Naval Base at Pearl Harbor External, Hawaii Territory, killing more than 2,300 Americans. The U.S.S. Arizona was completely destroyed and the U.S.S. Oklahoma capsized. A total of twelve ships sank or were beached in the attack and nine additional vessels were damaged. More than 160 aircraft were destroyed and more than 150 others damaged.

July 26, 1940, 4 months prior to the attack on Pearl Harbor President Roosevelt, with the intention of continuing to grant licenses froze all Japanese assets and ended trade by prohibiting the exportation of oil products preventing Japan whose dependency on the US for most of their crude oil and refined petroleum were ordered to depart from US harbors without loading or unloading cargo. In a confidential 26 page memo dated December 4, 1941 headlined “Methods of Operation and Points of Attack.” and “Japanese intelligence and propaganda in the United States” FDR chose to dismiss the red flags warning war was imminent. “In anticipation of possible open conflict with this country, Japan is vigorously utilizing every available agency to secure military, naval and commercial information, paying particular attention to the West Coast, the Panama Canal and the Territory of Hawaii”.

Yellow Peril Racism began to envelope the country; where at first the Japanese had been welcomed as cheap labor they now became criminals and terrorists and by Feb. 1942 Americans of Japanese ethnicity suspected of having even one drop of Japanese blood were ordered to Relocation Camps. The little Japanese girl who taught my father to write his name in kindergarten was sent to Manzanar and never seen or heard from again.

Allowed to only take bed linen, a few changes of clothing, a personal set of eating utensils and some toiletry articles, the internees were political prisoners left with little dignity as they were herded into the confines of barbed wire fenced enclosures as armed border agents in elevated towers stood guard. Family dynamics rapidly began to erode as multiple generations were forced into sharing living quarters with strangers in unfinished cold/hot and dusty tarpaper shanties with only straw-filled mattresses, a small stove to heat the room, and a single light bulb hanging from the ceiling. Lacking the basic amenities of running water, cooking and bathrooms facilities internees were subjected to communal un-partitioned showers, open toilets, and in Manzanar the constant threat of black widows spiders creeping out from dark crevices and agitated rattlesnakes coiled in corners ready to strike.

The social location of Japanese families gradually evolved into a new structural system of independence and disconnect from established traditions; Husbands felt shamed by their inability to protect and care for their families; with their patriarchy usurped many fell into the abyss of self-medicating with alcohol to relieve stress and feelings of inadequacy. Community dining hall bells announced meal time which served mystery meat and GI rations and rather than the accustomed family meals it became common for teens and children to eat with friends; Social construct flipped whereas before the Issei were in control, however due to a better command of English the Nisei had the ability to secure better jobs and higher wages becoming the dominate force of family politics.

Women no longer sweated their lives away performing domestic duties giving them more time to socialize, learn hobbies and complete their educations. Students were able to excel without having to compete with White students for coveted scholarly positions and were eligible to participate in a number of programs unavailable to them in secular institutions. Young ladies of marrying age found love and weren’t bound by arranged marriages.

Rafu Shimpo appears to represent a whole generation of people from the elderly to the youngest, from full Japanese to mixed racial heritage; whereas prior to internment traditional Issei parents determined Nisei were only allowed to marry within their own ethnic culture.

Pre-internment workers and business owners were primarily physical laborers yet are now highly educated with degrees from prestigious universities and hold prominent positions in major companies, own multi-million dollar corporations and reside in exclusive residential neighborhoods once reserved for “Whites Only.”

Traditional culture is still practiced within many of the communities to uphold long-established and time-honored celebrations and observances.

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Examining the historical link between the past and present the Japanese experience provides an inside look into the essence of how systems within communities continue to function successfully by integrating cultural traditions into the parameters of a governed dominate society.

Prior to becoming *The New Enemy* and carted off to internment camps the majority of Japanese American families experienced a moderate level of racism typical for minority groups of that era. Pro-discrimination laws were passed in the early 1900’s denied them the right to become citizens, own land, or marry outside their race. The 1907-1908 *Gentleman’s Agreement* consisting of informal letters between American and Japanese leaders virtually halted all Japanese contract labor to America and forbid the Japanese from buying homes in certain areas and barring them from jobs in various industries. By 1913 The California Alien Land Law prohibited Japanese as “aliens ineligible for citizenship” from owning agricultural land or possessing long-term farming leases. But for the most part the Japanese lived a peaceful life akin to other American families; owning or working in small businesses, children attending segregated public schools, men who voluntary joined the military and wives carrying out domestic duties.

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By 1924 immigration was completely blocked. In the early 1930’s the visiting Captain of a cargo freighter docked in Santa Barbara was given a tour of the city, while admiring the hillside scenery he lost his balance falling backwards into a bed of cactus. People burst out laughing; not understanding American sense of humor, the Captain felt he was being ridiculed and lost face, he vowed to get revenge on Americans and on Santa Barbara. On Feb. 23, 1942, approximately 6 weeks after the bombing of Pearl Harbor the freighter Captain, who subsequently joined the Japanese navy as a submarine commander surfaced his submarine near an oil field pier just north of Santa Barbara and shelled the pier. Furthering the fear of *Japs*.

The Dec. 7th bombing of Pearl Harbor was quickly followed on Dec. 8, 1941 when FDR froze US citizen Isai assets and ordered the FBI to follow community leaders by imposing curfews and raiding homes for anything advocating a connection to Japan.

#LetOurVoicesEcho #JapaneseExperience_11 #DortheaLange

Dorothea Lange’s censored photographs of the Japanese-American Internment

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#LetOurVoicesEcho Japs 3

#LetOurVoicesEcho Japs 1

Yellow Peril Racism

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Relocation 4

Relocation 1

#LetOurVoicesEcho Japanese Internment Instructions

Relocation 2

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#LetOurVoicesEcho #JapaneseRelocationCampEvacuees #Farm

#LetOurVoicesEcho #JapaneseRelocationCampEvacuees #Farmer 1942

#LetOurVoicesEcho #JapaneseRelocationCampEvacuees #SanFrancisco 1942_3

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They had about one week to dispose of what they owned, except what could be packed and carried for their departure by bus and were allowed only to take bed linen, a few changes of clothing, a personal set of eating utensils and some toiletry articles, the internees were political prisoners left with little dignity as they were herded into the confines of barbed wire fenced enclosures as armed border agents in elevated towers stood guard.

#LetOurVoicesEcho #JapaneseRelocationCampEvacuees

#Toyo Miyatake #JapaneseInternment #Manzanar #LetOurVoicesEcho

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#LetOurVoicesEcho #JapaneseRelocationCampEvacuees #SanFrancisco 1942

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#LetOurVoicesEcho #Japanese #PostonAZRelocationCenter 1945

#LetOurVoicesEcho #JapaneseRelocationCampEvacuees #Poston AZ 1942_

#LetOurVoicesEcho #JapaneseRelocationCampEvacuees #Seattle 1942_

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May 9, 1942 Centerville CA Farm Families waiting to board the train

#LetOurVoicesEcho J Lady & Baby

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First evacuees arrival at Granada Internment Camp

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Manzanar

The most notorious camp was Manzanar, built at the foot of the Sierra Nevada mountain range 230 miles northeast of Los Angeles. At its peak, over 10,000 people were interned in the 500-acre camp, enclosed by barbed wire, guard towers and armed military police.

Conditions at the camp were unforgiving. Daytime temperatures could reach 110 degrees, while nights could be freezing. Dust and wind were constant, and the crude barracks provided poor shelter. Within these barracks, each family was allotted a 20-by-25-foot cloth partition.

Most of the internees resolved to make the best of their situation, by attempting to create some semblance of normalcy for their indefinite detention. Some built all the facilities and trappings necessary to maintain a community of 10,000.

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#LetOurVoicesEcho Camp

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Relocation 8

Relocation 3

#LetOurVoicesEcho Cattle Truck

Relocation 7

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Japanese waiting for registration at the Santa Anita Reception Center (Photo by Russell Lee)#LetOurVoicesEcho #JanpaneseIntermentCamp_34

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Some letters arriving from Japanese-American Internment Camps during WWll were very specific asking for a certain kind of bath powder, cold cream or cough drops.

#LetOurVoicesEcho #AnselAdams #ManzanarInternmentCamp

Family dynamics rapidly began to erode as multiple generations were forced into sharing living quarters with strangers in unfinished cold/hot and dusty tarpaper shanties with only straw-filled mattresses, a small stove to heat the room, and a single light bulb hanging from the ceiling.

#LetOurVoicesEcho #JapaneseInternment_7

#LetOurVoicesEcho #JapaneseRelocationCampEvacuees #Vaccination

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Amache Japanese Internment Camp

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Looking back on Ansel Adams photographs of Japanese Interment Camp

#LetOurVoicesEcho Internment 5

#LetOurVoicesEcho #Manzanar #OrphanedChildren

Orphaned infants incarcerated at the Manzanar Children’s Village, some with as little as 1/8th Japanese ancestry were ripped from orphanages.

Lacking the basic amenities of running water, cooking and bathrooms facilities internees were subjected to communal un-partitioned showers, open toilets, and in Manzanar the constant threat of black widows spiders creeping out from dark crevices and agitated rattlesnakes coiled in corners ready to strike.

#LetOurVoicesEcho #JapaneseInternment_24

The social location of Japanese families gradually evolved into a new structural system of independence and disconnect from established traditions; Husbands felt shamed by their inability to protect and care for their families; with their patriarchy usurped many fell into the abyss of self-medicating with alcohol to relieve stress and feelings of inadequacy.

#LetOurVoicesEcho #JapaneseInternment_6

Community dining hall bells announced meal time which served mystery meat and GI rations, and rather than the accustomed family meals it became common for teens and children to eat with friends.

Relocation 6

Relocation 5

#LetOurVoicesEcho #JapaneseRelocationCamp #Manzanar

Manzanar teen getting ready to have breakfast

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A life Beyond Limits

#LetOurVoicesEcho #JapaneseRelocationCamp #TuleLake1942 Children

#LetOurVoicesEcho #SacramentoCA #TuleLake 1942

#LetOurVoicesEcho #ManzanarJapaneseStudents

#LetOurVoicesEcho #JapaneseRelocationCampMazanar #Graduation

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Potato Field shows people working against the vast backdrop of the High Sierra’s

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#LetOurVoicesEcho #TuleLake #Japanese 1945

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#LetOurVoicesEcho Interment 3

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Social construct flipped whereas before the Issei were in control, however due to a better command of English the Nisei had the ability to secure better jobs and higher wages thus becoming the dominant force of family politics.

#LetOurVoicesEcho #ManzanarJapanese

The first grave at Manzanar Center Cemetery

#LetOurVoicesEcho #Japanese #LamarCO #TopazRelocationCenter 1942 Funeral

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Mr. Watanabe’s signature carved into a low bordering wall

Japanese School MenHigh schooler’s attend a science lecture

Women no longer sweated their lives away performing domestic duties giving them more time to socialize, learn hobbies and complete their educations. Students were able to excel without having to compete with White students for coveted scholarly positions and were eligible to participate in a number of programs unavailable to them in secular institutions. Young ladies of marrying age found love and weren’t bound by arranged marriages.

#LetOurVoicesEcho #JapaneseExperience_6

Dorthea Lange

#LetOurVoicesEcho #DortheaLange #Manzanar 1944

Japanese American internees making camouflage netting at Manzanar. Photo Dorthea Lange July 1, 1944

#LetOurVoicesEcho #ManzanarJapaneseRelocationCamp #Dressmaking

Mrs. Dennis Shimizu.

Mrs. Dennis Shimizu

Japanese SchoolKiyo Yoshida, Lillian Wakatsuki and Yoshiko Yamasaki attend a high school biology class.

#LetOurVoicesEcho #JapaneseSumo #SantaAnitaCA

 

#LetOurVoicesEcho #ManzanarJapanese_3

The Manzanar Fishing Club.

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Minidota MN Family

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#LetOurVoicesEcho #JapaneseInternment_21May 11, 1942 A 23 yr old soldier volunteered July 10, 1941 and his mother in a strawberry field near Florin CA – The soldier had volunteered for the Army on July 10, 1941, and was stationed at Camp Leonard Wood, Missouri. He was furloughed to help his mother and family prepare for their evacuation. He is the youngest of six children, two of them volunteers in United States Army. The mother, age 53, came from Japan 37 years before. Her husband had been passed away for 21 years leaving her to raise six children. She worked in a strawberry basket factory until 1945(?) when her children leased three acres of strawberries “so she wouldn’t have to work for somebody else. 

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#LetOurVoicesEcho #JanpaneseIntermentCampGardenA Japanese Pleasure Garden built by Internees

#LetOurVoicesEcho #FrancesStewart #Manzanar Dec. 31, 1942

Dec. 31, 1942 photo by Frances Stewart#LetOurVoicesEcho #Racism #DortheaLange

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Nakamura with her two daughters “Joyce Yuki” and “Louise Tami” walking under a Japanese Style Pavillion. Manzanar Relocation Camp, Owens Valley California
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Manzanar, Calif.–Grandfather and grandson of Japanese ancestry at this War Relocation

#LetOurVoicesEcho #Manzanar #Miyatake #JoeBlamey

Joe Blamey Editor Manzanar Free Press #LetOurVoicesEcho #JapaneseInternment_20Ben Kuroki, the son of Japanese immigrants who was raised on a Hershey NB farm, is seen in this updated Army Corps file photo. The only known Japanese-American known to have flown over Japan during WWll

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#LetOurVoicesEcho Relocation Explaination

The Rafu Shimpo Newspaper appears to represent a whole generation of people from the elderly to the youngest, from full Japanese to mixed racial heritage; whereas prior to internment traditional Issei parents determined Nisei were only allowed to marry within their own ethnic culture.

#LetOurVoicesEcho #JapaneseExperience_12

#LetOurVoicesEcho J man

Mary “Mollie” Oyama Mittwer as *Deirde*  (1907–1994) was a Nisei journalist whose writing reflected many of the issues her generation faced during World War II. A leading writer of her generation, *Deirde* dispensed wisdom and controversy through various advice columns and articles, giving Nisei women and men a chance to voice opinions and receive feedback regarding the do’s and don’t’s of delicate topics such as dating and marriage, racism and integration and fielding questions mainly centering on the private lives of people concerned with arranged marriage vs  voluntarily marrying for love,  interracial and interethnic dating, fashion advice, incorporating Japanese traditions into modern day society while continuing to maintain the cultural standards their parents and grandparents expected.

The internment of Japanese Americans in the United States during World War II was the forced relocation and incarceration in camps in the interior of the country of between 110,000 and 120,000 people of Japanese ancestry who had lived on the Pacific coast. Sixty-two percent of the internees were United States citizens.

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Ansel Adams took this picture of fellow photographer Toyo Miyatake, who was interned at Manzanar. Ansel Adams/Courtesy Photographic Traveling Exhibitions

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The majority of photographs on this page were taken by Mr. Miyatake.

Before World War II, Miyatake had a photo studio in Los Angeles’ Little Tokyo. When he learned he would be interned at Manzanar, he asked a carpenter to build him a wooden box with a hole carved out at one end to accommodate a lens. He turned this box into a makeshift camera that he snuck around the camp, as his grandson Alan Miyatake explains in the video below, which is featured in the exhibit.

#LetOurVoicesEcho #ToyoMiyatake #Manzanar

Fearful of being discovered, Miyatake at first only took pictures at dusk or dawn, usually without people in them. Camp director Merritt eventually caught Miyatake, but instead of punishing him, allowed him to take pictures openly. Miyatake later became the camp’s official photographer, however, he could only set up the camera, and set up the shot, but a White person had to snap the shutter.

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His photos convey an intimacy with camp life absent in the pictures that Adams and Lange took. He captured laughter at a picnic and men delivering vegetables to the mess hall.

His photos also had moments of silent protest. In one picture three boys peer through the camp’s barbed wire fence to the outside world. And in another, Miyatake’s son, Archie, holds a pair of clippers against the fence, “to show,” that at some point, the barbed wire has to come down.”

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Toyo Miyatake as Grand Marshal

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Toyo Miyatake 1977#LetOurVoicesEcho #ManzanarJapanese_6

1977 Two Views of Manzanar – Co-Curator Patrick Nagatani ~ Photography by Graham Howe

Fred KOREMATSU

Fred Korematsu decided to test the government relocation action in the courts. He found little sympathy there. In KOREMATSU VS. THE UNITED STATES, the Supreme Court justified the executive order as a wartime necessity. When the order was repealed, many found they could not return to their hometowns. Hostility against Japanese Americans remained high across the West Coast into the postwar years as many villages displayed signs demanding that the evacuees never return. As a result, the interns scattered across the country.

In 1988, Congress attempted to apologize for the action by awarding each surviving intern $20,000. While the American concentration camps never reached the levels of Nazi death camps as far as atrocities are concerned, they remain a dark mark on the nation’s record of respecting civil liberties and cultural differences.

First, second, third, fourth and fifth generation of immigrants
Issei (一世 born in Japan immigrated to North America.
Nisei (二世 (second generation) children born in North America whose parents were immigrants from Japan.
Sansei (三世 (third generation) grandchildren of the Issei
Yonsei (四世 fourth generation
Gosei (五省 fifth generation
Obāsan お婆さん aunt or older woman generally referring to the grandmother of a Sansei
Ojiisan おじいさん general term for older men but generally referring to the grandfather of a Sansei
Nikkei (日系) was coined by a multinational group of sociologists and encompasses all of the world’s Japanese immigrants across generations. The collective memory of the Issei and older Nisei was an image of Meiji Japan from 1870 through 1911, which contrasted sharply with the Japan that newer immigrants had more recently left. These differing attitudes, social values and associations with Japan were often incompatible with each other. In this context, the significant differences in post-war experiences and opportunities did nothing to mitigate the gaps which separated generational perspectives.

#LetOurVoicesEcho #JapaneseExperience_9

1943 Manzanar Relocation Center taken by Ansel Adams –  L to R – Mrs. Kay Kageyama, Toya Miyatake, Miss Tetsuko Murakam, Mori Nakashima, Joyce Yuki Nakamura (eldest daughter), Corporal Jimmy Shohara, Aiko Hamaguchi (Nurse), Yoshio Muramoto, (electrician).

#LetOurVoicesEcho #Japanese #LamarCO #GranadaRelocationCenter 1945 #Last


ADDITIONAL READING
It Can Happen Here: The 75th Anniversary Of The Japanese Internment (Part I)
by Edward H. Levi Distinguished Service Professor of Law, The University of Chicago
Tracing the history of one of the most unconscionable tragedies in American history.

Citations:
5 Attacks on U.S. Soil During World War
http://www.history.com/news/history-lists/5-attacks-on-u-s-soil-during-world-war-ii
Second Generation Japanese Americans (Nisei) before WWII
http://picturethis.museumca.org/timeline/depression-era-1930s/second-generation-japanese-americans-nisei-wwii/info
When the Japanese Attacked Santa Barbara (1940s)
http://picturethis.museumca.org/timeline/depression-era-1930s/second-generation-japanese-americans-nisei-wwii/info

researcher-blk-wht

Kristeen Irigoyen-Hernandez
Researcher/Chronological Archivist/Writer; and member in good standing with the Constitution First Amendment Press Association
(CFAPA.org)

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A New England Thanksgiving

Kristeen Irigoyen-Hernandez aka Lady2Soothe

Thx 2

THE TRADITIONAL PILGRIMS STORY:
September 1620 one hundred and two people seeking religious freedom in the New World set sail from England on the Mayflower. The Mayflower was originally supposed to sail with a sister ship, the Speedwell, but it proved unseaworthy, so the Mayflower made the journey alone. In November 1620 the ship landed on the shores of Cape Cod, in present-day Massachusetts. A scouting party was sent out, and in late December the group landed at Plymouth Harbor, where they formed the first permanent settlement of Europeans in New England. A friendly Indian named Squanto who had learned English from fishermen taught the Pilgrims how to plant corn and other vegetables so the following year on the fourth Thursday in November 1621 Pilgrims in their silver buckled black hats and Indians adorned in buckskin leather and colorful feathers came together sitting down at a long table with a white linen tablecloth for a feast of turkey, vegetables, cranberry sauce, pumpkin pie with whipped cream and had lots of fun playing games, singing and dancing.

THE REAL STORY:
Not the bullshit fed by the media and politically run educational system… This was land belonging to Indigenous from time immemorial. Native lands and Reservations ARE NOT synonymous, and part of the root of America’s lie begins in history via every Indigenous/1st Nation Peoples’ ever born. This is Native Indigenous land, stolen, returned in 1806 and stolen again.

In order to understand the full scope of Indigenous lands and how this ties to Thanksgiving, let’s go back to 1590 when the Land Bridge Theory, also known as the Bering Strait Theory or Beringia Theory was originally proposed by the Spanish missionary Fray Jose de Acosta who produced the first written record suggesting a land bridge connecting Asia to North America. The Land Bridge Theory contends people migrated from Siberia to Alaska across a land bridge spanning the current day Bering Strait. The first people to populate the Americas were believed to have migrated across the frozen Bering Land Bridge while tracking large game animal herds.

The reemergence of the Land Bridge Theory came up again in 1902… The initial empirical confirmation for the long-held Land Bridge Theory came from the discovery of spear points near Clovis, New Mexico perpetuating the Clovis-First Theory in the early 20th century, between 1929 and 1937 by matching *similar* kinds of artifacts found in Beringia. However, the Land Bridge Theory has been busted in a multitude of ways and proved a myth as per “9 – repeat allele” genetic DNA marker. Due to the propagated lies people have never bothered to learn the truth and are spewing regurgitated sound-bites just as they’ve been trained to do by the media and the educational system. This **theory** was widely adopted by most modern textbooks since the 1930’s.

Getting back to Thanksgiving… As soon as Europeans crossed the Atlantic exploring and colonizing lands and people, epidemics of infectious diseases meant illness, death, and rapid depopulation. Endemic malaria-plagued European immigrants, infections of smallpox, measles, influenza, cholera, yellow fever, and tuberculosis killed some, diseases such as syphilis and gonorrhea frequently rendered others infertile, seriously altering patterns of reproduction and population replacement. The massive changes in land use which accompanied European colonization seriously compromised Indigenous people’s health through hunger and starvation unraveling the viability of traditional social and political organization.

The inhabitants of Jamestown VA, the first settlement were starving to death because they didn’t know how to grow their own food. These settlers spent most of their days digging random holes in the ground in search of gold instead of planting crops. By the beginning of 1610, the settlers at Jamestown were dining on “dogs, cats, rats, and mice. Some colonists dug corpses out of their graves to eat them.” One man murdered his pregnant wife and “salted her for his food.” The first Virginians were so desperate they went from taking Native American slaves to offering themselves up as slaves to the Native Americans in exchange for food.

Then came the pilgrims, although they didn’t call themselves Pilgrims, it’s possible nineteenth-century writers started using the term to give the impression the Mayflower’s Puritans were somehow nicer than the Puritans who stayed in England who were a sub sect of the Puritan movement. They came to America to achieve what their Puritan brethren continued to strive for. Now keep in mind, the Pilgrims were not just innocent refugees from religious persecution. They were victims of bigotry in England, some of them were themselves religious and the Puritans and Pilgrims saw themselves as the “Chosen Elect” as mentioned in the book of Revelation. They strove to “purify” first themselves and then everyone else of everything they did not accept in their own interpretation of scripture.

New England Puritans used any means, including deceptions, treachery, torture, war, and genocide to achieve that end. They saw themselves as fighting a holy war against Satan, and everyone who disagreed with them was the enemy. This rigid fundamentalism was transmitted to America by the Plymouth colonists. In the written text of the Thanksgiving sermon delivered at Plymouth in 1623 by ‘Mather the Elder’ who gave special thanks to God for the devastating plague of smallpox which wiped out the majority of the Wampanoag Indians who had been their benefactors. He praised God for destroying “chiefly young men and children, the very seeds of increase, thus clearing the forests to make way for a better growth”, i.e., the Pilgrims. In as much as these Indians were the Pilgrim’s benefactors, and Squanto, in particular, was the instrument of their salvation.

The pilgrims who settled in a land with bountiful natural resources, which was once Patuxet, a Wampanoag village, but it had been abandoned four years prior because of a deadly outbreak of a plague brought by European traders. Before 1616, the Wampanoag numbered 50,000 to 100,000, occupying 69 villages scattered throughout southeastern Massachusetts and eastern Rhode Island. In fact, the end times began for Massachusetts Indians several years earlier, when British slaving crews introduced smallpox carried by their infected cattle to coastal New England killing over ninety percent of the local population. Many also had been captured and sold as slaves. Thanksgiving enthusiasts view it as a celebration of the boldness, piety, and sacrifices of the first European migrants to American shores but in reality, the appearance of the Pilgrims marks the beginning of the end.

Squanto /Tisquantum, a native living in the area taught the colonists how to survive. Young Squanto had been captured in 1614-15 as a slave by Thomas Hunt, who came to Patuxet as part of a commercial fishing and trading venture commanded by Captain John Smith. After Smith left for England, Hunt, who was to take his dried fish cargo to Spain, kidnapped 27 Natives, including Squanto and sailed to Spain to sell them into slavery. After spending several years laboring as a ship-builder in London Squanto escaped and was finally able to return home only to discover his childhood home, and most of the other settlements along the east coast had been wiped out by the plague leaving a bunch of confused Europeans squatting in the remains of the village with no idea how to survive.

The Wampanoag, members of a widespread confederacy of Algonkian-speaking peoples known as the League of the Delaware. For six hundred years they had been defending themselves from my other ancestors, the Iroquois, and for the last hundred years they had also had encounters with European fishermen and explorers but especially with European slavers, who had been raiding their coastal villages. They knew something of the power of the White people, and they did not fully trust them. But their religion taught they were to give charity to the helpless and hospitality to anyone who came to them with empty hands. To the Pilgrims the Indians were heathens and, therefore, the natural instruments of the Devil. Squanto, as the only educated and baptized Christian among the Wampanoag, was seen as merely an instrument of God, set in the wilderness to provide for the survival of His chosen people, the Pilgrims. The Indians were comparatively powerful and, therefore, dangerous; and they were to be courted until the next ships arrived with more Pilgrim colonists and the balance of power shifted.

Squanto’s importance to the Pilgrims was enormous and it can be said they would not have survived without his help. It was Squanto who taught the Pilgrims how to tap the maple trees for sap, and gather fruit, nuts and berries. He taught them which plants were poisonous and which had medicinal powers, how to plant the Indian corn by heaping several seeds into low mounds and fertilizing with decaying fish in each mound. He also taught them to plant companion crops along corn because the seeds the Pilgrims brought consistently failed. He taught them how to fish for eels, trap for turkey, rabbits and other wild animals and introduced them to the fur trade, teaching them they could reduce their indebtedness to their London financial backers. Squanto mediated and traded on their behalf with local peoples and dealt with other native tribes; creating a peaceful trade system ensuring security against attack by giving them the means to obtain food supplement when their own supplies became insufficient, yet for all he did for them Squanto was accused of cultivating hostilities between the Indigenous and English. A last minute reprieve saved Squanto from being handed over for execution. Squanto was still a hostage to pre-America upon his death of Indian fever i.e. the White man’s plague on November 30, 1622, in Chatham, Massachusetts.

The original inhabitants living in the area now known as Brooklyn New York were Canarsees. They accepted various pieces of pretty colored junk from the Dutchman Peter Minuet in 1626. These trinkets have long since been estimated to be worth no more than 60 Dutch guilders at the time – $24 dollars in modern U.S. money. In exchange, the Canarsees “gave” Peter Minuet the island of Manhattan.

Because the Canarsees were strangers to the idea of “real property” it was common for one tribe to grant permission to another to hunt and fish nearby themselves on a regular basis. Fences, real and imagined, were not a part of their culture. Naturally, it was polite to ask before setting up operations too close to where others lived, but refusal in matters of this sort was considered rude. As a sign of gratitude, small trinkets were usually offered by the tribe seeking temporary admission and cheerfully accepted by those already there. It was clearly understood to be a sort of short-term rental arrangement.

Another Dutchman, Adrian Block, was the first European to come upon them in 1619. Block was also eager to introduce European commercialism and the Christian concept of “real estate”. Finding no fences around the land, they considered it to be in the public domain.

Not far from Manhattan, one tribe of about 10,000 Indians lived peacefully in a lovely spot on a peninsula directly along the ocean. There they fished in the open sea and inland bay. They hunted across the pristine shoreline and they were quite happy until they met a man, another Dutchman named Willem Kieft. He was the Governor of New Netherland in 1639. These 1st Nation Peoples’ were called the Rechaweygh (pronounced Rockaway). Soon after meeting Governor Kieft, they became the very first of New York’s homeless.

While the decimated Wampanoag helped the British boat people survive their first grueling year. In return for Indian generosity, Pilgrims stole their grain stores and robbed Wampanoag graves. Unknown author ~

“The next morning we found a place like a grave. We decided to dig it up. We found first a mat and under that a fine bow… We also found bowls, trays, dishes, and things like that. We took several of the prettiest things to carry away with us, and covered the body up again.”

While nature was no friend to the Pilgrims, their troubles were mostly their own doing. Poor planning was their downfall. These mostly city-dwelling Europeans failed to include among them persons with the skills needed in settling the North American wilderness. Having reached the forests and fields of Massachusetts they turned out to be pathetic hunters and incompetent butchers. With game everywhere, they went hungry. First, they couldn’t catch and kill it. Then they couldn’t cut it up, prepare it, preserve it and create a storehouse for those days when fresh supplies would run low. To compensate for their shortage of essential protein they turned to their European ways and their Christian culture. They instituted a series of religious observances. They could not hunt or farm well, but they seemed skilled at praying.

The Colonists developed a taste for something both religious and useful. They called it a ‘Day of Fasting’. Without food, it seemed like a good idea. From necessity, that single day became multiple days. As food supplies dwindled the ‘Days of Fasting’ came in bunches. Each of these episodes was eventually and thankfully followed by a meal. Appropriately enough, the Puritans credited God for this good fortune. They referred to the fact they were allowed to eat again as a “Thanksgiving.” Thus, the first written mention of the word “Thanksgiving”. NOTE: On the first Thanksgiving they were lucky if they got a piece of fish and a potato.

According to the Pilgrim Hall Museum, 53 of the colonists attended the celebration including famous names such as Bradford, Winslow, Miles Standish, and John Alden. True to the modern legend, they did invite the Wampanoag as well for the purpose of negotiating a treaty to secure the lands of the Plymouth Plantation for the Pilgrims. It should also be noted the ‘INDIANS’, possibly out of a sense of charity toward their hosts, ended up bringing the majority of the food for the feast. Winslow recalled:

“And although it be not always so plentiful as it was at this time with us, yet by the goodness of God, we are so far from want that we often wish you partakers of our plenty. King Massasoit and 90 of his men showed up outnumbering their hosts, and brought with them five deer they had hunted to contribute to the feast.”

The original feast in 1621 occurred sometime between September 21 and November 11. Unlike our modern holiday, it was three days long. The event was based on English harvest festivals, which traditionally occurred around the 29th of September. The Plymouth colonists and Wampanoag Indians shared an autumn harvest feast acknowledged today as one of the first Thanksgiving celebrations in the colonies.

However the first feast wasn’t repeated until 1636, so it wasn’t the beginning of a tradition, in fact, the colonists didn’t even call it Thanksgiving. To them, a thanksgiving was a religious holiday in which they would go to church and thank God for a specific event. The 1621 feast was a secular celebration, so it never would have been considered a thanksgiving in the Pilgrim’s minds; dancing, singing secular songs and playing games wouldn’t have been allowed.

After the first harvest was completed by the Plymouth colonists, Gov. William Bradford proclaimed a day of thanksgiving and prayer, shared by all the colonists and neighboring Indians. In 1623 a day of fasting and prayer during a period of drought was changed to one of thanksgiving because the rain came during the prayers. Gradually the custom prevailed in New England of annually celebrating Thanksgiving after the harvest.

Interestingly enough the colonists were contemptuous of the Indians, who they regarded as uncivilized and satanic heathens, and the fragile early peace between Native Americans and the early settlers would soon unravel in a horrific manner in what is now Mystic Connecticut. In 1637 the Pequot tribe was celebrating their own Thanksgiving, the Green Corn Festival. In the predawn hours, a band of settler English and Dutch Puritan mercenaries descended on their village longhouse of terrified women and children who huddled inside who were shot, clubbed and burned alive; over 700 native men, woman and children were slaughtered.

In 1636, a White man was found murdered in his boat and the colonists blamed the Pequot Indians. In retaliation English Major John Mason rallied his troops to burn Pequot wigwams then attacked and killed hundreds more men, women and children. According to Mason’s reports:

“We must burn them! Such a dreadful terror let the Almighty fall upon their spirits that they would flee from us and run into the very flames. Thus did the Lord judge the heathen, filling the place with dead bodies.”

The day after the massacre the Governor of Plymouth William Bradford wrote:

“Those that escaped the fire were slain with the sword; some hewed to pieces, others run through with their rapiers, so that they were quickly dispatched and very few escaped. It was conceived they thus destroyed about 400 at this time. It was a fearful sight to see them thus frying in the fire…horrible was the stink and scent thereof, but the victory seemed a sweet sacrifice, and they gave the prayers thereof to God, who had wrought so wonderfully for them. From that day forth shall be a day of celebration and thanksgiving for subduing the Pequots.”

Cheered by their “victory”, the brave colonists and their Indian allies attacked village after village. Women and children over 14 were sold into slavery while the rest were murdered. Boats loaded with a many as 500 slaves regularly left the ports of New England. Bounties were paid for Indian scalps to encourage as many deaths as possible.

Following an especially successful raid against the Pequot in what is now Stamford, Connecticut, the churches announced a second day of “thanksgiving” to celebrate victory over the heathen savages. During the feasting, the hacked off heads of 1st Nation Indigenous Natives were kicked through the streets like soccer balls. Even the friendly Wampanoag did not escape the butchery. Their chief was beheaded, and his head impaled on a pole in Plymouth, Massachusetts where it remained on display for 24 years.

For the next 100 years, Indigenous villages were attacked, thousands of men, women, and children were murdered, and for every invasion a Thanksgiving Day was celebrated as ordained by a Governor in honor of each bloody victory, thanking God the battle had been won, but with so many Thanksgiving Days each year and the killings becoming more and more frenzied, with days of thanksgiving feasts being held after each successful massacre, George Washington finally suggested only one day of Thanksgiving per year be set aside instead of celebrating each and every massacre.

For a brief time beginning in 1668, November 25th was considered the “legal” annual day of Thanksgiving, but the practice lasted only five years. Thursday may have become a tradition in order to distance the event from the Sabbath day among the Puritan Colonists. Thursday was also a typical day for lectures in New England, with ministers giving a religious talk each Thursday afternoon. This practice may have contributed to the Thursday Thanksgiving tradition. Since George Washington’s time, 1789, Thursday has been the day, solidified by Abraham Lincoln’s proclamation in 1863 designating the national day of Thanksgiving to be the last Thursday of November, which incidentally was on the same day he ordered troops to march against the starving Sioux in Minnesota.

Franklin Roosevelt observed Thanksgiving on the second to last Thursday of November for two more years, but the amount of public outrage prompted Congress to pass a law on December 26, 1941, ensuring all Americans would celebrate a unified Thanksgiving on the fourth Thursday of November.

Back then most retailers adhered to an unwritten rule that holiday shopping season didn’t start until after Thanksgiving, so no stores would advertise holiday sales or aggressively court customers until the Friday immediately following the holiday. When the floodgates opened on Friday, it became a huge deal.

In 1939, the Retail Dry Goods Association warned Franklin Roosevelt if the holiday season wouldn’t begin until after Americans celebrated Thanksgiving on the traditional final Thursday in November, retail sales would go in the tank. Roosevelt saw an easy solution to this problem: he moved Thanksgiving up by a week. Instead of celebrating the holiday on its traditional day, November 30th Roosevelt declared the next-to-last Thursday in November the new Thanksgiving, instantly tacking an extra week onto the shopping season.

Roosevelt didn’t make the announcement until late October, and by then most Americans had already made their holiday travel plans. Many rebelled and continued to celebrate Thanksgiving on its “real” date while derisively referring to the impostor holiday as “Franksgiving.” State governments didn’t know which Thanksgiving to observe, so some of them took both days off. By 1941, though, the furor had died down, and Congress passed a law making Thanksgiving the fourth Thursday in November, regardless of how it affected the shopping day which would ultimately become known as Black Friday.

According to Mashpee Wampanoag Tribal Historic Preservation Officer Ramona Peters, “It was Abraham Lincoln who used the theme of Pilgrims and Indians eating happily together in an attempt to calm tempers during the Civil War when people were divided. It was a nice unity story but it didn’t change the fact 1st Nation Indigenous Native Americans didn’t hate Europeans just for the clouds of shit-smelling awfulness they dragged around behind them. Missionaries met Indians who thought Europeans were “physically weak, sexually untrustworthy, atrociously ugly” and “possessed little intelligence in comparison to themselves.” The Europeans didn’t do much to debunk the comparison in the physical beauty department. Verrazzano, the sailor who witnessed the densely populated East Coast, called a native who boarded his ship “as beautiful in stature and build as I can possibly describe.” British fisherman William Wood described the Indians in New England as “more amiable to behold, though dressed only in Adam’s finery, than … an English dandy in the newest fashion.”

The idyllic partnership of 17th Century European Pilgrims and New England Indians sharing a celebratory meal appears to be less than 120 years-old. And it was only after the First World War a version of such a Puritan-Indian partnership took hold in elementary schools across the American landscape. We can thank the invention of textbooks and their mass purchase by public schools for embedding this “Thanksgiving” image in our modern minds. It was, of course, a complete invention, a cleverly created slice of cultural propaganda in another long line of inspired nationalistic myths.

James W. Baker, author of Thanksgiving: The Biography of an American Holiday, points to Alexander Young, author of an 1841 book about the Pilgrims, which referenced Winslow’s letter mentioning the harvest feast. Young added a footnote describing the event as “the first Thanksgiving,” and this idea apparently resonated with Americans. Today, the image of the Pilgrims in their buckled hats sitting down at the table to a sumptuous dinner with their Native American friends is a tradition imprinted in our minds

White people believe their ancestors won the land by being the superior culture. 1st Nation Indigenous lived in balance with mother earth; father moon, brother coyote and sister bear. One of the best examples of how people got Native Americans all wrong is Cahokia, a massive Native American city located in modern day East St. Louis. In 1250, it was bigger than London, and featured a sophisticated society with an urban center, satellite villages and thatched-roof houses lining the central plazas. While the city was abandoned by the time White people got to it, the evidence they left behind suggests a complex economy with trade routes from the Great Lakes all the way down to the Gulf of Mexico. Pilgrims couldn’t believe their luck when they found American forests just naturally contained “an ecological kaleidoscope of garden plots, blackberry rambles, pine barrens and spacious groves of chestnut, hickory and oak.”

The North American Indian population declined from an estimated 12 million in 1500 to barely 237,000 in 1900 represents a ”vast genocide . . . , the most sustained on record.” To date over 400 Pleistocene archeological sites in the western hemisphere older than 11,000 years old have been unearthed. Indigenous 1st Nation people have been here over 60,000 years, likely over 100,000 years, and there is a great deal of evidence to support it.

By the end of the 19th century, writes David E. Stannard, a historian at the University of Hawaii, native Americans had undergone the ”worst human holocaust the world had ever witnessed, roaring across two continents non-stop for five centuries and consuming the lives of countless tens of millions of people and are continuing to kill almost all wildlife, then polluted our water looking for gold, shoved bibles down our throats and refused to consider us until June 2, 1924 when Congress granted us citizenship to OUR OWN LAND.

Everyone wants to be an Indian, those Culture Vultures and counterfeit Buffalo Head Nickel Indians, masquerading around in faux buckskin and dyed turkey feathers proclaiming to be the grandchild of a Cherokee Princess or Chief; a Medicine Wo/men, Spiritual Teacher, Clan Mother, or “Tribal” Leader. Those who’ve read a book, claim to participate in authentic Indian rituals, or used an Indian name generator haven’t gone through Indian shit. Do they know what it feels like to be a real Indian? Real Indian’s, the Indigenous People are impoverished, suppressed, and oppressed.

Babies bounced off rocks, women raped with the barrels of guns, men forced to watch, then scalped and used as trophies. Dogs trained to attack children, then used later used to find tribes. Indigenous 1st Nations gifted or threatened to fight their neighbors while soldiers shot into the fighting. People placed on plots of land with no warmth in freezing conditions then selling their foods while children starved and froze to death.

Thanksgiving is a celebration of all these deeds because they are the original sins this holiday was created on. Pilgrim families were thankful for the free lands and the removal of threat. They were thankful for the new towns and jobs available to them…. Yes, they had a lot to be thankful for, because without our blood, they couldn’t live in a free comfortable environment. For those people who want to take *their* country back, take a DNA test and a history lesson then buy a one-way ticket back to Europe!

Because “No matter where you live in America, you’re living on occupied land that Indigenous peoples’ we’re murdered for.” ~ Frank Waln

IN CONCLUSION: If you’re going to be thankful for something this Thanksgiving Day be thankful Indigenous 1st Nations people only want equality and not White Genocide.

   

Phase 2 Essay

Kristeen Irigoyen-Hernandez aka Lady2Soothe

Authored by Peyton Damron

I had a difficult time thinking of where to begin, so I figured I would steal the format from Alcoholics Anonymous and implement it into this letter. What it was like, what happened, and what it’s like now.

I joined the docket about a year and 2 months ago. From as far back as I can remember before that, I had become my own anathema. Social anxiety would later cripple me and I wouldn’t be able to talk to anyone without saying something completely awkward and then going somewhere private so I could slap myself in the face. Normal people don’t act like this. My obsessive-compulsive disorder drove me to behave in different ways and has been a constant in my life since I was born. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. Footsteps need to be counted and end in multiples of 3 or 7. But you can’t count out loud or people will think you’re weird for talking to yourself. You can’t space out when counting in your head or people will think you’re autistic and try to get you counseling for the wrong diagnosis. You have to learn to count in your head and speak at the same time. You know, being coherent while counting ad infinitum is harder than you’d think. Don’t step on the sidewalk cracks either, if you do that the entire world will cease to exist around you. If you step on that sidewalk crack every person you’ve ever loved will disappear. If you step on that sidewalk crack there will be a natural disaster in every corner of the Earth’s atmosphere and it will be all your fault. Could you live with that? As I calculate the consequences of stepping on this sidewalk crack, I made an awful mistake. The back left corner of the heel of my right foot hit the crack. I could’ve sworn I pushed my foot far enough to not land there. Quick! You have 13 seconds to get back to the beginning of the block and try again. You get another shot at this, but you’ve got to be on time. Time to go to sleep, better lock the door, the deadbolt goes left, right, left, right, left, right. The regular knob lock just needs to go right, left, right, left.

Sorry, guess I went on a tangent there for a minute. But I figure I basically summed up my daily life for how it was, well that’s just how it was walking to school. On the way home I did the whole thing in reverse. And everywhere else I went the chaos was ceaseless. I felt as if my brain was melting from running on overdrive for so long. I discovered opioids. I had used other substances before but none of them took me out of myself as much as this did. I flooded my head with a cornucopia of opiates and I started to realize, I can step on this sidewalk crack and the world isn’t going to end, I can quit counting now and my family will still love me, I can talk to people now as if I’m one of them. My solution was simple; consume them all of the time.

Then something happened I hadn’t anticipated. I ran out. I became deathly ill and was as close to suicide as one can get without actually following through. “Heroin is cheaper and you get the same high for a fraction of the cost,” someone said to me. So I began consuming that regularly, and when that got expensive I learned that you can get the same feeling with less of it if you inject it, so I started consuming it that way. 1 year later I was living in a Walmart parking lot in a crummy Pontiac Aztec with some guy I barely knew who hadn’t showered in almost a month when I met him. That’s alright though, I only smelled him when I was dope sick.

The reason I’m on the docket is theft. This is how I supported my habit. I had nothing left that I owned that I could sell, so it was the only solution that I could see at the time. By the end of it I had become a shell of a man. The one who used to be the “fat kid” at school was now 6 foot 1 and weighed under 100 pounds. Luckily I was stopped in my tracks by several police officers along the way, and I decided to get signed up at “Recovery and Prevention Resources” aka “RPR” because I thought it would help my case. That’s how I got introduced to the docket. Through the docket and “RPR” I’ve gained a new sense of self. I learned how to deal with some of the things that run through my brain without invitation. I learned how to get over my fear of what others are going to think of me. And most importantly, I learned how to love myself. Thank you.

Columbus NEVER landed on American Soil, NOT in 1492, NOT Ever

Kristeen Irigoyen-Hernandez aka Lady2Soothe


Columbus quite literally landed in what is now known as the Bahamas and later Hispaniola, present-day Haiti and the Dominican Republic. So why do American’s celebrate this abominable man? Let’s just ignore the fact millions of humans already inhabited this land until later and look at the historical facts.

In the first place Columbus was not the first European explorer to reach the Americas having been preceded by the Norse expedition led by Leif Ericson; however, Columbus’ voyages led to the first lasting of European contact with America, inaugurating a period of European exploration and colonization of foreign lands until present-day. Therefore Columbus has had an enormous impact on the historical development of the modern Western world.

Forget those myths perpetuated about Columbus attempting to prove the earth is round because he got the math wrong and actually thought the earth was pear-shaped. He saw his accomplishments primarily in the light of the spreading of the Christian religion and finding gold to repay his debt to the crown.

The Nina and Pinta were not the names of two of Columbus’ three ships. In 15th-century Spain, ships were traditionally named after saints. Salty sailors, however, bestowed less-than-sacred nicknames upon their vessels. Mariners dubbed one of the three ships the Pinta, Spanish for “the painted one” or “prostitute.” The Santa Clara was nicknamed the Nina in honor of its owner, Juan Nino. Although the Santa Maria is called by its official name, its nickname was La Gallega, after the province of Galicia in which it was built.

In 1493 when Columbus arrived in Haiti, the Dominican Republic, and the Caribbean islands, there were eight million Indigenous Taino residents. That number, within a mere three years, was reduced to just three million.

Upon arrival, Columbus and his expedition met the Arawaks, Tainos and Lucayans, all friendly *Indians*, according to Columbus’ writings. When Columbus first saw the Native Arawaks who came to greet him and his crew he spoke with a peaceful and admiring tone. Impressed with the friendliness of the native people, Columbus seized control of the land in the name of Spain.

Columbus also helped himself to some locals. In his journal he wrote:

“As soon as I arrived in the Indies, on the first Island which I found, I took some of the natives by force in order that they might learn and might give me information of whatever there is in these parts. They … brought us parrots and balls of cotton and spears and many other things… They willingly traded everything they owned… They were well-built, with good bodies and handsome features…. They do not bear arms, and do not know them, for I showed them a sword, they took it by the edge and cut themselves out of ignorance. They have no iron. Their spears are made of cane. They would make fine servants…. With fifty men we could subjugate them all and make them do whatever we want.”

After several months in the Caribbean, on January 13, 1493, two Natives were murdered during trading. Columbus, who had described the Natives as gentle people wrote “(they are) evil and I believe they are from the island of Caribe, and that they eat men.” He also described them as “savage cannibals, with dog-like noses that drink the blood of their victims.”

Columbus introduced syphilis to Europe when he sold Native sex slaves to his men. Columbus wrote to a friend in 1500, “girls from 9-10 … are … in demand.” After Columbus’s first trip to the Caribbean, he returned to Spain and left behind 39 men who went ahead and helped themselves to Native women. Upon his return, the men were all dead.

With 1,200 more soldiers at his disposal, rape and pillaging became rampant as well as tolerated by Columbus. This is supported by a reported close friend of Columbus, Michele de Cuneo who wrote the first disturbing account of a relationship between himself and a Native female gifted to him by Columbus. Cuneo, wrote

“When our caravels … were to leave for Spain, we gathered … 1,600 male and female Indians and these embarked (with us) … on February 17, 1495 he wrote “While I was in the boat I captured a very beautiful Carib woman, whom the said Lord Admiral gave to me, and with whom, having taken her into my cabin, she being naked according to their custom, I conceived desire to take pleasure. I wanted to put my desire into execution but she did not want it and treated me with her fingernails in such a manner that I wished I had never begun. But seeing that (to tell you the end of it all), I took a rope and thrashed her well, for which she raised such unheard-of screams that you would not have believed your ears. Finally, we came to an agreement in such manner that I can tell you that she seemed to have been brought up in a school of harlots.”

Repeated accounts of cruelty and murder included testing the sharpness of blades on Native people by cutting them in half, beheading them in contests and throwing them into vats of boiling soap. Many of these red men, women, and children were

“roasted on spits,”

and the invaders

“hacked the children into pieces.”

Spanish historian and Catholic priest Bartolome de las Casas witnessed much of the carnage and said Columbus ordered his men

“ to cut off the legs of children who ran from them in order to test the sharpness of their blades.” and “Such inhumanities and barbarisms were committed in my sight as no age can parallel. My eyes have seen these acts so foreign to human nature that now I tremble as I write.”

Columbus’s men would make bets as to who would slit a man in two, or cut off his head in one blow. There are also accounts of suckling infants being lifted from their mother’s breasts, only to be dashed headfirst into large rocks. There was also a practice known as the “Montería Infernal”, the infernal chase, or manhunt, in which Natives were hunted by war-dogs. These dogs wore armor and had been fed human flesh, were a fierce match for the Indians. If his crew began running out of meat for their vicious dogs,

“Arawak babies were killed for dog food.”

Live babies were also fed to these war dogs as sport, sometimes in front of horrified parents.

Spaniards removed men from villages to work in gold mines and colonial plantations. This kept the Taíno from planting the crops which had fed them for centuries. They began to starve; many thousands fell prey to smallpox, measles and other European diseases for which they had no immunity; some committed suicide to avoid subjugation; hundreds fell in fighting with the Spaniards, while untold numbers fled to remote regions beyond colonial control. And on his return to Europe Columbus brought back the first Indigenous people as slaves all but wiping out the people to the Caribbean, leaving very few Indigenous Natives after 50 years; as many as three million people, approximately 85 percent of the Taíno population had vanished by the early 1500s

By Columbus’ second voyage to the New World in 1495, he brought cannons and attack dogs. If a native resisted slavery, he would cut off a nose or an ear. If slaves tried to escape, Columbus had them burned alive. Other times, he sent attack dogs to hunt them down, and the dogs would tear off the arms and legs of the screaming natives while they were still alive. He was so desperate for gold to repay the Spanish bankers which financed him Columbus refused to believe there was almost no gold on the island so he forced Natives to work in gold mines until exhaustion. Those who opposed were beheaded or had their ears cut off and he forced the island’s Taino inhabitants to bring him a ‘hawk’s bell’ full of gold dust every three months. Those who complied were given a ‘token’ to wear around their necks. Those who didn’t, as Columbus’s son Fernando reported, were

“punished by having their hands cut off” and were “left to bleed to death.”

In two years’ time, approximately 250,000 Indians on Haiti were dead.

In August 1504 Colonists complained to Governor Francisco De Bobadilla of the monarchy about mismanagement and a royal commissioner was dispatched to Hispaniola to arrest Columbus and his two brothers, slapped them into chains, and shipped them off to Spain to answer for their crimes against the Arawaks. But the King and Queen of Spain, their treasury filling up with gold, pardoned Columbus and let him go free, but by then only about 100,000 Taino’s remained alive.

Columbus derived most of his income from slavery, De Las Casas noted. In fact, Columbus was the first slave trader in the Americas. As the native slaves died off, they were replaced with black slaves. Columbus’ son became the first African slave trader in 1505.

Tens of thousands of Indigenous people were killed because they would not convert to a religion completely foreign to them, one of which they understood neither the content nor the language being spoken to them. Columbus was a tyrant, a murderer and nothing short of a pimp and pedophile, he didn’t discover, he invaded, destroyed and conquered. Columbus didn’t just marginalize Indigenous people he mutilated and nearly decimated them because in his eyes 1st Nation Indigenous peoples of the Americas stood in the way of European ‘progress’ hampering western expansion. What followed was rape, murder, destruction and all forms of genocide, land, resource destruction and theft.

The portrayal of the man with 3 ships who came to befriend the Natives is an utter fallacy. The Whitewashed White romantic myth is a complete falsehood because one cannot ‘discover’ what was never lost in the first place! Unlike Christopher Columbus, 1st Nation Native people always knew where they were, right here on Turtle Island.

It has been estimated there were upwards of 100 million Indigenous people living in the area we call the America’s. At the time of the Europeans found hundreds of different culturally, richly textures settled people’s scatters all across the land, most with very complex and sophisticated matriarchal social/political organizations and belief systems. Voyagers showed up, their names are the ones extolled in your White history books, not the names of First Nations people who got the Europeans where they wanted to go!

Winona LaDuke ~ Columbus was a perpetrator of genocide. He was a slave trader, a thief, a pirate and most certainly NOT a hero. To celebrate Columbus is to congratulate the process and the history of invasion.

False Flags, Hoax’s and Crisis Actors

Kristeen Hernandez aka Lady2Soothe
HIGHLIGHTED LINKS UNDERLINED IN BLUE ARE EMBEDDED LINKS TO NEWS SOURCES. CLICKING OPENS THE FULL ARTICLE IN A NEW TAB.

A FALSE FLAG doesn’t mean it’s fake and people aren’t injured or die. The perverse truth is a False Flag means people are set up to die for a political agenda. The term FALSE FLAG means simply that one group sets up a REAL event with REAL casualties in a blatant attempt to accuse another group of doing it, thus giving them an excuse to ‘rightfully’ attack said group… These are REAL events born by psychopaths in order to ‘justify’ an invasion on a peaceful entity… The US is a failing political system, a PLUTOCRACY which stages false flags against its own citizens in order to gain favor to fight never-ending wars over natural resources, and feeds its citizens an altered version of history which favors its own agenda while hiding atrocities. All to foster a false sense of patriotism which is used to manufacture your allegiance to a corporate entity masquerading as your government.

The contemporary term false flag describes covert operations that are designed to deceive in such a way activities appear as though they are being carried out by entities, groups, or nations other than those who actually planned and executed them.

Historically, the term “false flag” has its origins in naval warfare where the use of a flag other than the belligerent’s true battle flag before (but not while) engaging the enemy has long been accepted as a permissible ruse de guerre; by contrast, flying a false flag while engaging the enemy constitutes perfidy.

Operations carried out during peace-time by civilian organizations, as well as covert government agencies, can (by extension) also be called false flag operations if they seek to hide the real organization behind an operation.

Hoax: to trick into believing or accepting as genuine something false and often preposterous. An act intended to trick or dupe. Imposture the victim of a cruel hoax assumed the bomb threat was just a hoax. Something accepted or established by fraud or fabrication

42 FALSE-FLAG ATTACKS OFFICIALLY ADMITTED TO
In the following instances, officials in the government which carried out the attack (or seriously proposed an attack) admit to it, either orally, in writing, or through photographs or videos

CRISIS ACTORS
CRISIS ACTORS are professional actors used by government agencies and/or the mainstream media to deceive the public with portrayals of trauma and suffering. The crisis actors participate in a false flag event such as a bombing or mass shooting simulated by the conspirators, usually government or corporate forces in order to achieve some goal such as justifying increased government surveillance, disarmament of the population, or military action against blamed nations or groups. Crisis actors are claimed in this context to play the part of bystanders or witnesses, emergency response personnel, and with the aid of stage makeup wounded victims of the attack.

CrisisCast
Award winning role play actors and film makers specially trained in disaster and crisis management.Our role play actors are psychologically trained in criminal and victim behaviour.

NOW HIRING CASUALTY ROLE PLAYERS

to Support an Oregon National Guard Disaster Preparedness Exercise at:
Camp Rilea in Warrenton, OR 
Saturday and Sunday, 8-9 April 2017.

COMMENT: Steve Presley – 5 star… Had a great time there during the WW2 reenactment

This exercise will be an Oregon state emergency response to a simulated incident involving various contamination elements. CRPs will be moulaged (injury make-up and fake blood) to portray various physical and emotional injuries and conditions, and will go through medical triage, decontamination, and medical treatment several times during each day of the exercise. Arrival times will be early morning each day, and the exercise will run 8-9 hours on 8 April and 4 hours on 9 April. CRPs will be provided cut-away prop clothing and will be washed in decontamination lines to simulate the cleaning off of contamination substances.

This is an excellent paid opportunity to show appreciation for these brave men and women of the Army National Guard. Those who have participated in past National Guard disaster preparedness exercises have found it very rewarding: you get to support this important State and community service and get paid to have FUN while doing so.

ELIGIBILITY: There is no security clearance requirement, so it is open to all, but criminal background and U.S. employment eligibility checks will be accomplished. Priority will be given to those with previous experience with role playing, acting, military, and/or first responder/disaster response experience. We also look for diversity among our CRPs, including gender, ethnicity, age, body types, disabilities, and foreign language abilities. American Sign Language speakers are also desired. Due to a potentially strenuous medical/decontamination process, and varying outside temperature, CRPs may not have a life-threatening or serious medical conditions.

CASUALTY ROLE-PLAYER APPLICATION (2017)
http://work4hds.com/apply/
National Guard Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and High Yield Explosive (CBRNE) Enhanced Response Force Package (CERFP) Disaster Response Training Exercise
Please note: You have to be willing to submit to, and pass, a Background Check in order to support this exercise. Please note applicants who have a felony conviction on their record are not eligible to work as a CRP.

CRPs will be moulaged (injury make-up and fake blood) to portray various physical and emotional injuries and conditions, and will go through medical triage, decontamination, and medical treatment several times during each day of the exercise.

CRPs will be provided cut-away prop clothing and will be washed in decontamination lines to simulate the cleaning off of contamination substances.

This is an excellent paid opportunity to show appreciation for these brave men and women of the Army National Guard. Those who have participated in past National Guard disaster preparedness exercises have found it very rewarding: you get to support this important State and community service and get paid to have FUN while doing so.
Availability (Choose One): *

TIFTON, GA – Mar 28, 2017 – Pay: $120
ALBANY, GA – Mar 29, 2017 – Pay: $120
PERRY, GA – Mar 29, 2017 – Pay: $120
PERRY, GA – Mar 30, 2017 – Pay: $120
PERRY, GA – Mar 29 and 30, 2017 – Pays: $240
TIFTON (Mar 28), ALBANY (Mar 29), PERRY (Mar 30) – Pays: $375
WARRENTON, OR (April 8, 2017) – $125
WARRENTON, OR (April 9, 2017) – $75
WARRENTON, OR (April 8-9, 2017) – $200
SPOKANE, WA (April 8, 2017) – $125
SPOKANE, WA (April 9, 2017) – $75
SPOKANE, WA (April 8-9, 2017) – $200

Choose this option if you are not available for any of these dates, but wish to be considered for future opportunities.
When making hiring selections priority will be given to those who select multiple day support options.

Would you like to be considered for a Team Leader (TL) position?
For details. Lunch, snacks, and soft drinks/water will also be provided.

HOW TO APPLY: Interested individuals may apply at http://work4hds.com/apply/.
If you have worked for HDS in the past 12 months as a CRP – or have applied to work as a CRP– and wish to participate– visit http://work4hds.com/HDSverified<span>.

Questions may be sent to Craig Byrnes, HDS Director of Field Operations, at craig.byrnes@human-domain.com cc: kurt.marisa@human-domain.com

Check operations you have supported for HDS: *
Virginia National Guard
Ohio National Guard
Oregon National Guard
Florida National Guard
West Virginia National Guard
Washington National Guard
Louisiana National Guard
Kentucky National Guard
Alabama National Guard
Georgia National Guard
Nevada National Guard
Washington D.C. Area Operations

Crisis Actor Employment Las Vegas